KRAUT BIEROCKS

September 19, 2013

As you may have gotten an inkling from the name, this is a german dish.

David went away for a work retreat last week, and for his welcome home gift, I wanted to bestow upon him something with one of his favorite foods: sauerkraut. Actually, these these are just kraut (German for cabbage), rather than sauer (pickled). But yummy and cultural and boy-food-ish, nonetheless. Schultz is German, after all (as is my maiden name).

Last week we found ourselves in the car on a several hour road trip. Being the strange, fun-loving pair we are, one thing led to another and I was teaching David German. With three hours in a car ride you can cover quite a lot. I’m proficient at best, but three years in high school and four semesters in college got me somewhere. That, plus this recipe, is why we’re almost bonafide Deutscher!

Kraut Bierocks from Rachel Schultz

KRAUT BIEROCKS
Serves 3-4

1 hot roll mix (I used this one)
1 yellow onion, diced
1 pound ground turkey (or beef)
1 head cabbage, shredded
Salt & pepper
Olive oil

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare hot roll mix up to the step where you divide bread into individual squares. Cover with bowl and allow to sit for 30 minutes. In a skillet over medium heat, cook meat and onions until meat is browned. Stir in cabbage and season with salt & pepper.

Cover and simmer for 20-30 minutes. Meanwhile, roll dough into a large rectangle and cut into 16 squares. Fill dough with 2 tablespoons meat filling. Press edges to seal. Arrange in a 9×13 baking dish, seam side down.

Drizzle rolls with olive oil. Bake rolls for 25-30 minutes.

KRAUT BIEROCKS
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 1 hot roll mix (I used this one)
  • 1 yellow onion, diced
  • 1 pound ground turkey (or beef)
  • 1 head cabbage, shredded
  • Salt & pepper
  • Olive oil
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare hot roll mix up to the step where you divide bread into individual squares. Cover with bowl and allow to sit for 30 minutes. In a skillet over medium heat, cook meat and onions until meat is browned. Stir in cabbage and season with salt & pepper.
  2. Cover and simmer for 20-30 minutes. Meanwhile, roll dough into a large rectangle and cut into 16 squares. Fill dough with 2 tablespoons meat filling. Press edges to seal. Arrange in a 9x13 baking dish, seam side down.
  3. Drizzle rolls with olive oil. Bake rolls for 25-30 minutes.

Adapted from Yes, I Want Cake.

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Comments

  • LaToya

    By far the most delicious recipes I have encountered!!!!

  • Oh wow these look so fun and soo yummy! My husband is so stinkin’ proud of his german heritage I know he would just die if I made these! Plus with Oktober fest coming up, how fun to pair this with a german lager?! I can’t wait to try these! Pinning :)

    • Rachel Schultz

      Yes! Oktoberfest! I hadn’t even thought of that.

  • Angie

    These look great! My family loves flavorful food. Do you have any suggestions on spice/ herb additions that might be good in these?

    • Rachel Schultz

      We went salt & pepper only – which I think is a more traditional german way – simple meat and bread dishes.

  • rachel! these look delicious! if you want a great sauerkraut (or kimchi) recipe, I recommend this one: http://michaelpollan.com/books/cooked/sauerkraut-recipe/. I just made it a few weeks ago…it was super easy! have a great day! :)

    • Rachel Schultz

      Thanks Kelley! Yum.

  • kerry

    I was so happy to see this recipe! I live in an area where homemade beerocks/bierocks were on the lunch menu in elementary school many years ago. We have beerocks shops too and you can easily find them at the deli. I was told the beerocks come from one area of Germany and many of those immigrants came here to the Fresno area of central California. I absolutely love them. Your recipe looks great and I can’t wait to make them!

    • Rachel Schultz

      Thanks so much! That’s neat to hear the nostalgia they have for you :)

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