CHICKEN SHAWARMA IN THE OVEN!

January 21, 2019

Personal requirements when I’m making these for them to be incredible are: super soft pitas (probably from the deli section), lots of crunchy carrots in and around the wrap (and hummus), and THIS MARINADE. I love the flavor combined with the hummus and sauce. My husband really likes this type of cuisine, so this recipe was made as a little love letter to him.

I’m not really a kitchen gadgets person; I don’t have a lot of them at all and generally don’t really like them. BUT I asked for an immersion blender for christmas and I am very into it.

I like that for making dressings, sauces, or smoothies, I don’t have to dirty the whole blender or food processor. Mine came with a plastic cup (with measurements!) I can just put in the dishwasher, and then I rinse the attachment off as soon as I’m done and put it away. It’s like it was never here. WAY less cumbersome than the blender. I seriously love it and it’s only $32 on amazon. I used it for the sauce in this recipe!

Chicken Shawarma in the Oven!
Serves six

2/3 cup lemon juice, divided
1/2 cup olive oil, divided
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons pepper
2 teaspoons paprika
1 teaspoon red pepper flake
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
2 onions, sliced
3 tablespoons greek yogurt
4 cloves garlic
1 tablespoon onion powder
1 tablespoon fresh dill
6 pitas
Hummus
Sliced carrots

Combine 1/3 cup lemon juice, 1/4 cup olive oil, salt, pepper, paprika, red pepper flake, and cinnamon in a gallon plastic bag with chicken breasts. Marinade in fridge for 2 hours, or overnight works too.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Pour chicken and marinade into a lined 9×13 baking dish. Top with onions. Roast for 40 minutes. Slice chicken.

Make sauce by combining in a blender, immersion blender, or food processor 1/3 cup lemon juice, 1/4 cup olive oil, greek yogurt, garlic, onion powder, and dill.

Spread hummus on pita and layer on chicken, onions and sliced carrot. Top with sauce and additional dill.

CHICKEN SHAWARMA IN THE OVEN!
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • ⅔ cup lemon juice, divided
  • ½ cup olive oil, divided
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons pepper
  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flake
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
  • 2 onions, sliced
  • 3 tablespoons greek yogurt
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1 tablespoon fresh dill
  • 6 pitas
  • Hummus
  • Sliced carrots
Instructions
  1. Combine ⅓ cup lemon juice, ¼ cup olive oil, salt, pepper, paprika, red pepper flake, and cinnamon in a gallon plastic bag with chicken breasts. Marinade in fridge for 2 hours, or overnight works too.
  2. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Pour chicken and marinade into a lined 9x13 baking dish. Top with onions. Roast for 40 minutes. Slice chicken.
  3. Make sauce by combining in a blender, immersion blender, or food processor ⅓ cup lemon juice, ¼ cup olive oil, greek yogurt, garlic, onion powder, and dill.
  4. Spread hummus on pita and layer on chicken, onions and sliced carrot. Top with sauce and additional dill.

 

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THE RENOVATIONS PLANNED FOR 2019

January 14, 2019

This year feels like more of a question mark for some of our goals because what we can do is largely dependent on DOLLARS. But, below I have some loose guiding goals we would hope to get done. Lots of the first floor is at least generally addressed, so something throughout the year is slowly adding and refining details to those areas as I source them or find inspiration.

I feel like the first 75% or 90% of a room is one thing – construction and big furniture choices. Then the rest I end up going slow on to find just the right details!

Now that we are done with most major renovations (except for basement and two bathrooms) it’s a lot more furnishing and decorating than like, hardcore demo. Which is fun! The undertakings feel less life consuming.

WINTER

Master bedroom: Now that everything on the first floor has been at least touched, I feel like we can do a little something on the biggest priority upstairs, which is making our master nicer. To start it will be just a few things to make it feel not abandoned and more comforting – paint, a little moulding, and a platform bed. I’m saving my pennies for this one. It in particular is funded by when I have petty cash to go toward it.

Dining room: We just finished it!

Kitchen: With the island complete, the only things left for phase two are styling out with a few accessories and building some open shelves for the corner. I’m moderately interested in a stokke high chair, but woof to that price. I’m saying “phase two” is done, but really the only thing left in a “phase three” would be very much luxury things to have that I’d most likely only dedicate money toward if like, the rest of the house is pretty much done. Things like changing out countertops for stone and replacing the backsplash. Actually, it’d be nice to fix the lighting (and have recessed can lights) sooner than that, but that will be several hundred.

SPRING

Landscaping: With framing our front porch we feel inspired to keep going and make our mostly nothing-done-to-it exterior better. I’d like to start by just lining the front of the house with boxwoods. This should be about $300.

Garden: David likes gardening and he and our children will work on it together, so we want to probably make a raised bed and do some vegetables together this summer.

SUMMER

Build a backboard: We like our basketball pad in our backyard, and with two failed attempts to hang two different backboards (involving renting scaffolding), David decided to make a wooden one, which I am really excited about. Will be cool for backyard’s vibe and we can make it just the size and color we like. Also not too expensive!

Paint our fence: We should probably do this someday. I feel like “priming limbo” is a thing, where you are painting something white and have primed it, and thus kind of achieved the finished look, but it takes you forever to feel motivated to truly finish it with the top coat.

AUTUMN

Shelving in mudroom: In preparation for colder months it’d be good to have better organization for receiving all our hats, coats, and bags when we get home or come inside from snow play. Also the more we live with our functional dining room, the more I see the need for this room to be closed storage since we pass through it for dining.

BasementI’d really love (almost need?) to have our basement available for play before going through another winter. We’ll have to do some problem solving for some obstacles.

Doing our master bathroom is such a strong desire, but it will need a lump sum of money dedicated to it and we’d have to see when that becomes available. It’d be part hired out, to convert the shower into a freestanding tub.

One great thing about hiring out is that it can go anywhere in the schedule because we don’t have to do it! And for diy-ers like us it feels crazy easy to just oversee someone and occasionally answer questions!

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VEGETABLE PRINT LARGE SCALE ART

January 10, 2019

The most frequently asked question about our finished dining room last week was about the huge art! People wanted to know if I made it myself and the answer is yes. But it is not too hard, and a really good way to create a large scale piece of art for a low price.

My goal was to find something for the wall behind the table, and I wanted to use as little budget as possible. I considered some kind of mural, framing some wallpaper, a few shelves, or maybe putting up some mirrored panels. I saw this piece from textile designer rebecca atwood and it inspired me to go for a vegetable print in an inexpensive way.

Sometimes “diy art” that seems no fail can still look very amateur or bad diy-ed. I included some tips below that I think help make it look more like a professional piece.

The total cost for this enormous 44 x 106 inch piece was about $62. I’m pleased with that number! I made potato prints with acrylic paint on a large piece of muslin fabric. The biggest savings came from how we made our own frame instead of having it put in a glass one. David built it using trim pieces. Then you can staple or hot glue gun the fabric to the back side. The piece will be flimsy, but then we screwed it directly into the wall for it to be totally secure!

MATERIALS

Fabric: $16
Yukon potatoes: Like $1, I guess
Acrylic paint: $5
Trim: $27
Light duty staple gun: $10
Staples: $3

PROCESS

  1. Wash fabric and iron to remove any wrinkles
  2. Lay fabric across a flat surface.
  3. Dip quartered potatoes into paint and press several prints onto fabric.
  4. Reload with paint and repeat.
  5. Cut and paint trim to desired size.
  6. Attach pieces together on the back side with a staple gun and 1/4” staples.
  7. Hot glue muslin to back of frame, taking care to prevent dimpling.
  8. Attach frame into wall with a brad nailer.
  9. Spackle and touch up paint nail holes.

TIPS

  1. I usually would do about five stamps with each loading of paint, but it looks great when there’s variation of pressure and texture, so every few lines and for different sections I would do something a little different – with color, pressure, spacing, or how straight or curved I made my line.
  2. For my shape, I used yellow yukon potatoes and halved them once in each direction.
  3. The colors I used for mixing my shades were delta brand acrylic paint “white,” “waterfall,” “charcoal,” and “midnight blue.” More muted tones are my favorite!
  4. Dab moisture off of potato before using. As it gets messy, replace with a new one. Slight variety in size looks nice. Keep wet wipes on hand!
  5. When assembling frame, shoot the staples into the thickest part of the trim to avoid them popping through the front.

It also is not very time intensive. I believe I worked on the vegetable print part for only about two hours. Not bad, as far as crafting goes.

The rest of the sources for the dining room and the whole budget breakdown are here!

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