SWITCHING OUT A KITCHEN FAUCET

November 15, 2018

Alternate Title: “I Guess Faucets Aren’t Expensive?” I just thought a not ugly kitchen faucet was going to be a few hundred. Not sure if that was never accurate or if the home depot and lowe’s types are just improving their options. I really liked my pretty faucet for our powder room, so I felt hopeful home depot would have a good kitchen option too AND THEY DID.

Guys, this faucet was SIXTY FIVE DOLLARS. I am so happy with it! We could have done it sooner! It has inspired me to take the time in advance to check prices of things I am putting off because I think it will be expensive, but really may be no big deal.

Now we can discuss metal trends and how I think satin nickel has died.

First, there are a lot of differences in the old faucet we inherited from the previous owner and the new faucet. The size is much more elegant (and functional for cleaning big items!). And there are many more, better details. But, the most basic difference is the metal finish. Metals are so funny, and I completely think of them like wood tones for how their trends go. They just change like clockwork every ten years or so.

All of these orange wood kitchens people are trying to get rid of, at some point people were like “I just have to get that orange shade of wood for my kitchen cabinets!”

The same “orange wood” mood is my mood with satin nickel, so I’m saying bye. Right now what looks good to me is polished chrome. It is one of my favorite metals that I honestly think is the most timeless (maybe basic black too?) and always looks pretty good. But still, maybe I am biased slash an unreliable narrator.

Antique brass was or is very popular. I am wondering if it is starting to be done? I am not intentionally a very trend oriented person for my own choices (especially with clothes). I maybe even actively avoid really popular trends. But I do think phases of when people like and don’t like things is very interesting in a social-psychological way. And how much I am affected, like it or not. Like at one point in 2013 chevron looked so good to me. And now it completely doesn’t! Like, what changed? Just my state of mind I guess and maybe how many times I was exposed to it. Also I have a theory that in home decor what people generally like when they are 27-30 year olds is what they like until they are about 60 and then they make an update.

Our plumber was around to change our dishwasher hook up shortly after we did this and I asked him how much he would have charged to change a faucet. He said between $100 and $500, depending on how damaged the attachments are and if he has to drill them off. David did ours and it probably was about on par with the difficulty of changing a light fixture is as far as diy-ing goes.

Some people say kind of corny things like “the faucet is the statement necklace of the kitchen,” but whatever wording we go with it is a big detail that very much changes the vibe.

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BAKED SPAGHETTI

November 12, 2018

Do you like making lasagna but IF YOU’RE BEING HONEST know those large noodles are a bit cumbersome to work with. ALSO that kids kind of can have a hard time dealing with eating all that during the eating part. 

So if you want lots of the goodness of something lasagna style, try baked spaghetti! It’s cozy and filling and crispy cheesy good.

Lastly, another one of my favorite meal traits, doesn’t require handling any raw meat!

Baked Spaghetti
Serves six

16 ounces spaghetti
2 cups tomato pasta sauce
1 onion, diced
2 teaspoons olive oil
6 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup pepperoni, diced
3 cups shredded mozzarella
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pepper
6 eggs
1/2 cup milk
Grated parmesan

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Prepare spaghetti according to package instructions. Toss cooked spaghetti in tomato pasta sauce.

Saute onion in a skillet with olive oil over medium heat for 4 minutes. Add garlic and saute for 2 more minutes.

Toss spaghetti, onion, garlic, pepperoni, mozzarella, salt, and pepper in a large bowl.

In a sperate bowl whisk together eggs and milk.

Transfer spaghetti mixture to a greased 9×13 baking dish. Pour egg mixture over spaghetti. Top with grated parmesan.

Bake for 30 minutes.

5.0 from 1 reviews
BAKED SPAGHETTI
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 16 ounces spaghetti
  • 2 cups tomato pasta sauce
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 6 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 cup pepperoni, diced
  • 3 cups shredded mozzarella
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 6 eggs
  • ½ cup milk
  • Grated parmesan
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Prepare spaghetti according to package instructions. Toss cooked spaghetti in tomato pasta sauce.
  3. Saute onion in a skillet with olive oil over medium heat for 4 minutes. Add garlic and saute for 2 more minutes.
  4. Toss spaghetti, onion, garlic, pepperoni, mozzarella, salt, and pepper in a large bowl.
  5. In a sperate bowl whisk together eggs and milk.
  6. Transfer spaghetti mixture to a greased 9x13 baking dish. Pour egg mixture over spaghetti. Top with grated parmesan.
  7. Bake for 30 minutes.

 

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A DIY DINING ROOM TABLE

November 8, 2018

Maybe the BEST part of building your own dining table is that you can make it exactly the perfect size for your room. I wanted something as big as possible so we could seat lots of people, but not too big that it obstructed flow. Not an inch could go to waste in either direction!

We had a great experience back when we built an outdoor dining table for our screened porch and from that momentum we were ready to build the table for our dining room.

All the materials were about $250 including paint.

honeycomb rug | natural wood stools | shaker chairs | banquette diy | cordless roman shade

We love our outdoor table, but couldn’t make it again because for a built-in bench banquette you need a pedestal table. Four legs at the corners would obstruct being able to sit down at the bench. We aren’t expert carpenters by any means, so we modified the plans from ana white’s triple pedestal farmhouse table.

That original plan is very farmhouse-y, which is not my vibe in this home. So I did any tweaks I could to downplay that. We made our top one large, smooth piece instead of having planks (which I like better both stylistically and functionally, for wiping up.) We omitted the overhang from the center stretcher (that feels super mission-style to me). Also we needed only two pedestals, not three for our table size.

Having one item that is a little farmhouse is no big deal when it will be in a room filled with lots of other stuff. The other biggest part is that we painted ours crisp white instead of wood stain which I think feels more polished and less rustic. We did three coats of high gloss behr ultra pure white with a brush and foam roller. (Same as what I did for when we built the banquette!)

Because the tabletop will be extremely high traffic and I want it to be very clean-able, we did three coats of latex polyurethane. Before starting, David tested a bit of the polyurethane on the bottom of the tabletop to make sure it wouldn’t turn yellow and it passed the test.

He lightly sanded the surfaces with 120 grit sand paper and cleaned off any dust with a damp cloth. Then we applied the poly using a paint pad, saturating the pad in a paint tray before wiping it on lightly in straight lines. It worked best to start inside the table surface and wipe toward the edge to avoid streaking. If any large quantities of bubbles formed, David would smooth them out with the edge of the paint pad lightly. Most bubbles would resolve themselves as the poly set, so it was fine if there were a few here and there after the application.

After the surfaces were covered, we waited about three hours to apply the next coat. (It was humid outside so dry time was a little longer than normal.) Before putting the next coat on we lightly sanded everything with 120 grit sandpaper again and cleaned the surfaces with a damp cloth. We opted for four coats, sanding between each and let it cure outside for two weeks to make it as strong as possible.

The price break down was about $45 for the tabletop wood, $175 for other lumber and screws, $25 for the poly, and $8 for poly-ing supplies.

It’s a beauty! 83 x 24 inches of family table gold! As we get more of the basics in the dining room I can start layering in all the dimension soon!

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