FILIPINO PULLED PORK WITH SWEET POTATOES

November 5, 2018

Consider this a little new flavor for your crockpot meal rotations. When making pork loin I am pretty exclusive to the crock. They just do so well in there! There’s almost no other way! And then it shreds up so easily.

And sweet potatoes as a side are one of our favorites. The hearty-but-still-sweet-ness is a perfect complement to so many savories. Including this pork right here.

Filipino Pulled Pork with Sweet Potatoes
Serves four

1 and 1/2 pound pork loin
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
6 cloves garlic, smashed
1 teaspoon pepper
6 bay leaves
3 sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed
2 tablespoons butter
1 tablespoon honey
2 tablespoons milk
Green onions, sliced

Place pork loin in slow cooker with soy sauce, brown sugar, apple cider vinegar, garlic, pepper, and bay leaves.

Cook on low for 7-8 hour or high for 5-6 hours.

Place sweet potatoes in a pot and cover with water. Bring to boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes.

Mash sweet potatoes in a stand mixer with butter, honey, and milk.

Shred pork loin and serve with sweet potatoes and green onion.

FILIPINO PULLED PORK WITH SWEET POTATOES
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 1 and ½ pound pork loin
  • ¼ cup soy sauce
  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 6 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 6 bay leaves
  • 3 sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • Green onions, sliced
Instructions
  1. Place pork loin in slow cooker with soy sauce, brown sugar, apple cider vinegar, garlic, pepper, and bay leaves.
  2. Cook on low for 7-8 hour or high for 5-6 hours.
  3. Place sweet potatoes in a pot and cover with water. Bring to boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes.
  4. Mash sweet potatoes in a stand mixer with butter, honey, and milk.
  5. Shred pork loin and serve with sweet potatoes and green onion.

 

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CHICKEN MEATBALL SOUP

October 29, 2018

This soup has tiny meatballs in it! That seems fun! I make the meatballs a little less than one inch thick because the smaller they are the better. They say for a good soup every ingredient should be able to fit on a spoon!

My family loves soups, and it is one of my favorite meals to prepare too. Don’t forget crusty bread.

Chicken Meatball SoupChicken Meatball Soup
Serves six

1 pound ground chicken
2/3 cup panko bread crumbs
1/2 cup grated parmesan
1 egg
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 tablespoon dried parsley
3 teaspoons salt, divided
1 teaspoon pepper
3 carrots, diced
1 onion, diced
3 celery stalks, diced
1 tablespoon olive oil
8 cups vegetable broth
1/2 cup white wine
3 cups small pasta (I used ditalini)
5 ounces spinach
Grated parmesan

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Combine ground chicken, bread crumbs, parmesan, egg, garlic powder, parsley, 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper in a mixing bowl. Shape into 3/4 inch meatballs and arrange in a lined 9×13 baking dish. Bake for 30 minutes.

Cook carrot, onion, and celery with olive oil in the base of a stock pot over medium heat for 6 minutes.

Add broth, white wine, and 2 teaspoons salt. Increase heat to high and bring to a boil.

Once boiling, add pasta and cook for 6 minutes.

Add meatballs and cook for 1 minute.

Add spinach and cook for 1 more minute.

Serve topped with parmesan.

CHICKEN MEATBALL SOUP
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 1 pound ground chicken
  • ⅔ cup panko bread crumbs
  • ½ cup grated parmesan
  • 1 egg
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon dried parsley
  • 3 teaspoons salt, divided
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 3 carrots, diced
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 3 celery stalks, diced
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 8 cups vegetable broth
  • ½ cup white wine
  • 3 cups small pasta (I used ditalini)
  • 5 ounces spinach
  • Grated parmesan
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Combine ground chicken, bread crumbs, parmesan, egg, garlic powder, parsley, 1 teaspoon salt, and pepper in a mixing bowl. Shape into ¾ inch meatballs and arrange in a lined 9x13 baking dish. Bake for 30 minutes.
  3. Cook carrot, onion, and celery with olive oil in the base of a stock pot over medium heat for 6 minutes.
  4. Add broth, white wine, and 2 teaspoons salt. Increase heat to high and bring to a boil.
  5. Once boiling, add pasta and cook for 6 minutes.
  6. Add meatballs and cook for 1 minute.
  7. Add spinach and cook for 1 more minute.
  8. Serve topped with parmesan.

Adapted from Ina Garten.

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WRAPPING A CONCRETE PORCH IN WOOD

October 26, 2018

We have hit the first step to beautifying our curb appeal. As soon as I can, I want to build a portico of sorts off of the front door. Our house’s vibe needs it and it will make the front look much more soft and balanced. That will be kind of expensive so it may be some time.

But a beginning part that is not as expensive is encasing this scary, sad, rough, and damaged concrete front porch in smooth, spacious, beautiful wood.

The alternate title for this post is I Stood in Our Front Yard and Stared at My House for a Long Time. Picking the right proportions was key to it looking good!  The before is small and unhappy and the concrete is very rough and awful to sit on or generally ever come in contact with. This photo is an after, and then the before.

(Note: I think agonizing over decisions is a healthy and important part of decorating. Noticing the details is what will make something good. It’s like how a writer must choose the perfect words to make you have the emotions he wants you to. As the reader you might mostly just feel the book was good. But the author has to think about why you felt the book was good and know the inner workings of what will make you have that feeling. Interior design is the same way, I think.)

After I agonized over a lot of dimension decisions, David built the pressure treated frame in pieces, burying sections of it in the ground as we went. To secure the pieces of the frame to the posts, we used these rss screws, pre-drilling about 1/2” with a 1/2” spade bit so the screw-heads would sink under the surface of the wood.

Once the frame was built and secured, we attached joists every 16 inches using deck screws in the front and joist hangers on the side closest to the house. Then we attached more pieces to the posts to bring the sides of the deck down to ground level. We had to dig out some areas of dirt in order to attach these pieces.

After the entire frame was complete, we screwed the deck boards into the joists with deck screws to finish the top surface. We needed to rip cut one of the deck boards with a table saw in order to fit everything in to meet up with the siding.

We added a step as the deck was too high off the ground for a non-giant to enter. The process of building the step was a lot like making a mini version of the deck. We built a frame, buried the posts in the ground and secured it to the deck, then attached deck boards to the top.

Then I waited like six months! That is because you have to let the pressure treated wood dry out before you paint or stain. (We just did as late as we could before it was too cold.) To prep for paint we sanded the screw holes, swept, shop vac-ed, and sprayed with the hose at a high setting. David wiped off any standing water with a towel and we let it dry for 24 hours. The next day we painted using two coats of behr porch and floor paint in “palais white.”

ALSO THERE MAY NOT BE SUCH A THING AS TOO MANY PUMPKINS.

It’s so much prettier than before and will come to life even more once we do some of our landscaping in the spring. I find myself wanting to decorate it with things more too because it has enough dignity to deserve it.

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