You are now reading part 3/4 of our first attempt to ever upholster anything. And like the ambitious soul I am, I’ve (a bit foolishly) chosen a very hard task for my maiden voyage.

Here you can read part one and part two.

photo 3

We had the chair completely stripped down and were ready to place fluffy layers of pure, white, clean padding onto it’s old wood frame. This was the point where I needed to just pause, take a deep breath and start stapling stuff on instead of worrying or feeling like I didn’t know what I was doing. Once I’d stapled a few pieces on I quickly felt relief. “Hey, I’m actually doing this,” said myself. Most steps of upholstery are really forgiving because staples are 100% removable. And the stuff won’t even been seen, so that’s a great phase to get your sea legs. I mean, upholstery legs? When you think about how big the whole task is, it is daunting. But I just took it one step at a time.

Next, we had the piece of wood cut to replace all the springs and woven material in the seat. I sliced up some thick foam to the same shape and used spray glue to adhere it to the wood.

UPHOLSTERING THE ARMCHAIR from Rachel Schultz

We wrapped it in another layer of batting before adding the fabric. Dave was totally the MVP of this whole project. To upholster things, you have to be pretty strong. One, to manipulate and pull the fabric just where you want it. And two, if you don’t have an air compressed staple gun (we don’t) you have to give a bit of oomph to get the staples in well (depending on the type of wood you’re going into).

Don’t get me wrong, a girl could probably do this project by herself. But a very pregnant, kind of pansy girl could not.

UPHOLSTERING THE ARMCHAIR from Rachel Schultz

A tip we found really helpful: use your palms instead of finger tips when spreading fabric so as to prevent dimpling. 

The place we hit a roadblock was tufting. I was so proud of myself for buying a little button kit and learning to make buttons. Only to realize when I went to begin the tufting that we no longer had a wood base or thick enough foam to secure the tufts.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

UPHOLSTERING THE ARMCHAIR from Rachel Schultz

You can see there that our backing is only sheer padding, so there’s nothing to anchor the tufts and well, tuft them. We would have had to add a board or some thick foam, so I chose to just skip our buttons. A little sad, but I was cutting myself so much slack from perfection on this project.

We continued to work on the chair and apply fabric a little at a time most weeknights. Upholstering can really be a puzzle, so we found it was good to just work on it a little at a time a then put it away for a while.

And now! We are what I would call 90% done. Look at this!

UPHOLSTERING THE ARMCHAIR from Rachel Schultz

I never thought this day would come. I’m kind of kidding because really as described above, David ended up being the main workhorse. But I watched him work and felt really emotionally invested the whole time so that’s totally 50/50, right?

The remaining 10% is finishing the staples around the curve of the arms and, of course, TRIM to cover all those staples.

We’re in a dangerous spot right now when you’re so close to being done with a project you’ve kind of lost the fire under you to knock out that last little bit. And it’s functional so it’s easier to not feel the urgency to see it to completion. We’ll see how long it takes for me to finally put this one to bed.

{ 0 comments }

Okay, I’m not a seamstress. I have a very basic knowledge of sewing. Most of the things I try are pretty self-taught or trial and error. But take heart! Because I do okay and so even if you’re not a master of the craft, you can do this project. With no pattern!

I started by going to Jo-Ann’s to search for a pattern. Yes, they had one, but it was something crazy like $17. When I looked over it, it was so simple, I knew I could do it myself.

SEW A CRIB SKIRT WITH NO PATTERN from Rachel Schultz

IF YOU CAN CUT RECTANGLES AND SEW IN A STRAIGHT-ISH LINE, YOU CAN DO THIS. I’ve seen lots of nurseries with a very minimalist look that skipped the skirt all together. While I love that look, as apartment dwellers, we need to take advantage of all the hidden storage we can, including under the crib.

SEW A CRIB SKIRT WITH NO PATTERN from Rachel Schultz

Once all the bare bones were sewn together I wanted to add a little bit more detail. This pom pom was only $4 a yard (plus I probably used a coupon.)

SEW A CRIB SKIRT WITH NO PATTERN from Rachel Schultz

I sewed it on with a zig zag stitch and left a little trim folded around the edge to prevent fraying. The final product is fab, especially since even the most basic skirts at Babies ‘R’ Us are $30+.

Processed with VSCOcam with f2 preset

It covers all the items under the crib and adds a cute additional texture. A couple other tiny things have happened in the nursery. First, I re-did the mobile (in the exact same way) with a new color. From the start, I knew I wasn’t satisfied with the pastels. Right away I felt this neutral, one color version suited the room much better.

We also got that cool abacus on the top shelf because baby needed at least one toy, right? Although we are toy minimalists. I’m sure I’ll talk about this more later, but we see our little one have like, five toys. You can barely see, but the top shelf of orange bookshelf is left open for curating those play-things.

SEW A CRIB SKIRT WITH NO PATTERN from Rachel Schultz

And lastly, I added a little battery operated clip on light to the shelving. This room has no outlets, but I wanted there to be another option than the harsh overhead light for middle of the night feedings. Must be gentle on the sweet one’s eyes.

The only thing still irking me about the room is the bare wall opposite the door. There is art on the left, but I just feel that the wall NEEDS something. I’d love to hang some cute prints, but David is skeptical of the safety in case they fall on baby. Does anyone have experience with hanging art directly over cribs? Is that a no-no?

{ 5 comments }

When cooking for two, side dishes don’t always come into play. Around our house, I make four servings of something. We eat it for dinner, and then our lunch the next day.

I imagine for a bigger family, side dishes are lifesavers. The other night I made an entree with two bonus sides and the whole meal felt more home-cooked, intentional, and celebratory. I know, it’s such a small thing. But having a couple side dishes takes it from just-get-enough-nutrients-down-my-gullet-to-sustain-me to we’re-family-here-communing-and-eating-a-meal. For that reason I say, long live sides!

CORN SPOON BREAD from Rachel Schultz

CORN SPOON BREAD
Serves 5-6

1 cup cornmeal
2 cups milk
1 cup heavy cream
1/4 cup sugar
1 tablespoon salt
1/4 teaspoon red pepper flake
30 ounces corn
1/2 cup cheddar, shredded
3 egg yolks
3 scallions, sliced
Salt & pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Bring milk, heavy cream, sugar, and salt to a simmer in a skillet over medium heat. Add corn and corn meal and cook for 5 minutes. Reduce heat to low, cooking for 3 more minutes. Allow to cool and stir in red pepper flake, cheddar, egg yolks, and scallions. Season with salt & pepper. Transfer to greased 9×13 baking dish. Bake for 10 minutes covered with foil. Remove foil and bake for 15-20 more minutes.

CORN SPOON BREAD from Rachel Schultz

4.0 from 1 reviews
CORN SPOON BREAD
 
Author:
Serves: 5-6
Ingredients
  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon red pepper flake
  • 30 ounces corn
  • ½ cup cheddar, shredded
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 3 scallions, sliced
  • Salt & pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Bring milk, heavy cream, sugar, and salt to a simmer in a skillet over medium heat.
  3. Add corn and corn meal and cook for 5 minutes. Reduce heat to low, cooking for 3 more minutes.
  4. Allow to cool and stir in red pepper flake, cheddar, egg yolks, and scallions. Season with salt & pepper.
  5. Transfer to greased 9x13 baking dish.
  6. Bake for 10 minutes covered with foil. Remove foil and bake for 15-20 more minutes.

Adapted from Sunshine Sweet.

{ 2 comments }

GEOMETRIC MOSAIC ART

September 16, 2014 · 0 comments

in Apartment

The second art DIY I did for our bedroom ended up being David’s favorite. It’s one of the biggest pieces, but was very simple and non-artist friendly to complete.

GEOMETRIC MOSAIC ART from Rachel Schultz

STEP 01: Use painters tape to section off the canvas.

STEP 02: Fill in shapes in between lines of painter’s tape with color.

STEP 03: Remove tape and allow to dry.

GEOMETRIC MOSAIC ART from Rachel Schultz

This project would be great on larger or smaller scales too. I may do another one, using all the same color to add a pop to a different space. You can see links for details on the rest of the gallery here.

BEDROOM GALLERY from Rachel Schultz-2

{ 0 comments }