SWEET POTATO ALFREDO

March 24, 2015

I have written before about the process of an idea becoming a post. This recipe might set the record for the longest time lapse I had purchased all the ingredients and scheduled to make it the day I went into labor last fall. The first several months with a newborn I was not doing much experimentation in the kitchen. (More of a cook to survive mentality!)

And now, many, many weeks later this sweet potato alfredo got made, tested, and tweaked. And now a few more weeks later it is here. It is a culinary treasure as you will see. (Also, this is a bit of an explanation for why a Fall-time food is being shared in March. It is good year round, of course. Or save it for later!)

SWEET POTATO ALFREDO from Rachel SchultzSWEET POTATO ALFREDO
Serves 3-4

1 sweet potato, cubed
1 onion, quartered
3 cloves garlic
1 cup heavy cream
2 teaspoons olive oil
1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
4 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup parmesan, shredded
1 teaspoon red pepper flake
1/4 cup pine nuts
3 tablespoons chives, chopped
1 pound fettuccine, cooked al dente
Salt & pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Drizzle sweet potato, onion, and garlic with olive oil. Season with salt & pepper. Roast for 15 minutes. Pulse roasted ingredients in a food processor with heavy cream and balsamic vinegar. Add sweet potato mixture to a skillet with parmesan and butter. Stir until well incorporated and butter and cheese are melted. Toss fettuccine in sauce. Top with red pepper flake, pine nuts, chives, and salt & pepper.

SWEET POTATO ALFREDO from Rachel Schultz

SWEET POTATO ALFREDO
 
Author:

Ingredients
  • 1 sweet potato, cubed
  • 1 onion, quartered
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • ½ cup parmesan, shredded
  • 1 teaspoon red pepper flake
  • ¼ cup pine nuts
  • 3 tablespoons chives, chopped
  • 1 pound fettuccine, cooked al dente
  • Salt & pepper

Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Drizzle sweet potato, onion, and garlic with olive oil. Season with salt & pepper. Roast for 15 minutes.
  3. Pulse roasted ingredients in a food processor with heavy cream and balsamic vinegar.
  4. Add sweet potato mixture to a skillet with parmesan and butter. Stir until well incorporated and butter and cheese are melted.
  5. Toss fettuccine in sauce. Top with red pepper flake, pine nuts, chives, and salt & pepper.

 

JALAPENO CURRY HUMMUS

March 19, 2015

I do not like chickpeas proper. Many hummus experiments have been performed just to avoid or minimize them (edamame, “everything bagel,” or ginger & cilantro). The persistence is to please my husband who loves the traditional stuff. After enduring so many variations, bless his heart, he sweetly suggested we just make the classic kind. Do not get me wrong, the others are good, but if you are wanting the plain original it is a little bit torture to have not quite the thing you love over and over and never the real deal.

This time, I set out to do it. But I still had to change it up a little with yellow curry and jalapeno. That is the life of being married to a food blogger, I suppose.

JALAPENO CURRY HUMMUS from Rachel SchultzJALAPENO CURRY HUMMUS
Serves about 2 cups

30 ounces chickpeas
4 limes, juiced
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon salt
3 cloves garlic
1 tablespoon curry powder
1 jalapeno

Pulse ingredients together in a food processor.

JALAPENO CURRY HUMMUS from Rachel Schultz

Serve with crackers or pita chips.

JALAPENO CURRY HUMMUS from Rachel Schultz

JALAPENO CURRY HUMMUS
 
Author:

Ingredients
  • 30 ounces chickpeas
  • 4 limes, juiced
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 1 tablespoon curry powder
  • 1 jalapeno

Instructions
  1. Pulse ingredients together in a food processor.
  2. Serve with crackers or pita chips.

 

MOVING A HOUSE

March 17, 2015

As the harsh winter months blazed on, our search for a new home continued with little activity. We saw two more houses last night. One was our favorite yet, but still probably not good enough. (No upstairs bathroom and at the very furthest reach of the distance out of town we would be willing to go). The second was kind of a pity visit because I did not like anything about the house, but it was in a fun spot near some friends so I had to at least give it a look. We liked it as little as we expected and as a bonus the previous residents were smokers!

The long, patient wait for the inventory to pick up drags on and meanwhile I busy myself by entertaining farfetched ideas for making something out of this current nothing market. The title of this post is not about moving to a new house, it is about moving a house.

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I know it is crazy, but let us review the facts. Fact 1: The Schultzes want land. Fact 2: The Schultzes want a 2,000+ square feet house with character. Both of those together is a tall order. The large home in a great location that also has a lot of land would often be out of our budget. This is how we arrive at the wild scheme of moving a house.

In the cute downtown area of small towns (too far outside the city for us) there are charming homes with basically no yards. They go for cheap because they are so far out. Combine that house with a big plot somewhere else that is empty (or with a small house to tear down) and you have everything we want!

Now for the details of the moving a house part. Before you totally blow the idea off, this came to the forefront of our minds because a friend of ours did this when they were building and needed to clear a house off the land. And when I was in elementary school, the owners of the home across from the school bought a house downtown for $1 and proceeded to move the house through the whole city and attach it to their original home. For the afternoon all the teachers brought us out on the front lawn and we watched the house come down the street. With these two stories, we can now affirm that it has been done and I have even seen it with my own nine year old eyes.

Next I must convince you (and David) why it would be worth doing. I did some research and found a company who does this in Michigan. I called “my house moving guy,” Don, and got a quote for moving a two-story 2,000 square foot home from distance A (small town outside of city) to distance B (a hypothetical spot of land we could buy) – a total of nine miles. Don says building a foundation is about $10,000. He would charge $20,000 for the actual moving. And then comes the probably largest and also most variable cost – “lines.” This is the cost of having roads shut down and cable, electric, phone, etc. lines turned off and raised. He said depending on the route and distance, that could be $10-50k.

If we estimate the whole house move to be $80,000, then that would still leave a considerable part of our budget to buy a small town house for a steal and a plot of land. And it would have made the sweet downtown house on good acreage possible when it otherwise did not exist.

Our conclusion is that if the right piece of land and the right “movable” home started popping up, we would consider this plan. But all the pieces would have to really be falling together nicely. If you are like others who I have told about this theory and have asked why we would not just build, the answer is that I could not have less interest in building. Too many tiny questions to answer and it is tough to get everything just right. I would rather make something already existing into what I love. And with building I would not have the opportunity to do my very favorite thing – restore a fixer upper.

House Hunting Wish list

Our time hunting has now lasted from wearing boots to sandals. I am ready to find something, but also sort of believe we never will. Like when you anticipate something for so long you do not believe the day will actually come. Of course it will, though. Our realtor said April and June are the most booming months.

As I started with, this is probably just idle time wasting and soon a normal house buying situation will come into view. Or maybe not.

Copyright © Rachel Schultz 2015

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